Category Archives: News

Gone 64 Years

“When I am dead, I hope it is said,
‘His sins were scarlet, but his books were read’.” ─ Hilaire Belloc

Hilaire Belloc died July 16, 1953. He was 11 days short of his 83rd birthday.

Read a contemporary obituary.

Lost Trust

“Instead of asking themselves why they lost people’s trust, the media instead asked why the people had lost trust in them. A subtle, but important difference.” — Milo Yiannopoulos

Political Ideals

“Political ideals will vary according to men’s views on human destiny. Those who are persuaded that the purpose of life is pleasure, or power, or honour, will reckon that State best arranged in which they can live comfortably, or acquire great wealth, or achieve great power and lord it over many. Others who think that the crowning good of virtue is the purpose of our present life will want an arrangement under which men can live virtuously and peaceably together. In short, political judgment will be settled by the sort of life a man expects and proposes to lead by living in a community.” — St. Thomas Aquinas: Commentary on Aristotle’s ‘Politics,’ Book II, lect. 1.

In Which Case…

“You can spend your own money on yourself in which case quality and price are paramount. You can spend your money on others in which case price is paramount and quality less so. You can spend others’ money on you in which case you will have a fine lunch. Or you can spend other peoples money on other people in which case you have government.” — Milton Friedman

Elections Matter

“We have always known that eternal vigilance is the price of freedom. It’s worse now, because capture of government is so much more important than it once was. There was a time when there was enough freedom that it hardly mattered which brand of crooks ran government. That has not been true for a long time — not during most of your lifetimes, and for much of mine — and it will probably never be true again.” — Jerry Pournelle

More Reed on today’s reporters

“Journalists are not stupid, running to well above average in intelligence. You could form a large chapter of Mensa by raiding newsrooms in Washington. However, with a fair few exceptions, they are not intellectuals, not contemplative, not studious. They are high-pressure fact-accountants, competitive, comfortable under tight deadlines, aggressive, combative, quick but shallow. This can be a serviceable substituent for stupid.” — Fred Reed

Otherworldly Twits

“Do you wonder why the legacy media are such puzzled otherworldly twits? Why, for example, they had no idea what was happening in the recent election? Why they seem to know so very little about America or much of anything else?

“Some thoughts from a guy who spent a career in the racket:

“Ask journalists when they were last in a truck stop on an Interstate, last in Boone, North Carolina or Barstow, California or any of thousands of such towns across the country. Ask whether they were in the military, whether they have ever talked to a cop or an ambulance crewman or a fireman. Ask whether they have a Mexican friend, when they last ate in a restaurant where a majority of the customers were black. Whether they know an enlisted man, or anyone in the armed services. Whether they have hitchhiked overnight, baited a hook, hunted, or fired a rifle. Whether they have ever worked washing dishes, harvesting crops, driving a delivery truck. Whether they have a blue-collar friend. Know what the Texas Two-Step is, have been in a biker bar.

“Now do you see why Trump surprised them?” — Fred Reed

If You Don’t Read Books

“…the most suggestive thing I saw in America the past 18 months I actually think of an item in a hotel gift shop in southern Florida. It was a decorative kitchen towel, I think made locally. It bore these words: ‘America, 2016.’ Below that it said, ‘Once we had Steve Jobs, Johnny Cash and Bob Hope. Now they’re gone, and we’re outta jobs, outta cash and outta hope. And below that it said, “Please Kevin Bacon, don’t die.”” — Peggy Noonan, at the Catholic University Commencement

Clever line, but what’s it got to do with reading? Well, follow the link and read the rest of her remarks – it’s worth it!