Gone 64 Years

“When I am dead, I hope it is said,
‘His sins were scarlet, but his books were read’.” ─ Hilaire Belloc

Hilaire Belloc died July 16, 1953. He was 11 days short of his 83rd birthday.

Read a contemporary obituary.

Lost Trust

“Instead of asking themselves why they lost people’s trust, the media instead asked why the people had lost trust in them. A subtle, but important difference.” — Milo Yiannopoulos

Secularization of Christianity

“The conclusion to which I have found myself forced is twofold: first that what we are being offered [secularization, ed.] is not a reinterpretation of the Christian religion but a substitute for it, and secondly that the arguments offered, from whichever field of study they have been drawn, are quite unconvincing.” — E. L. Mascall

Paranoia

I’m sorry, I just can’t help myself…

I’m so old, I can remember when it was conservatives who saw Russians under every bed.

There, I said it.

The Safety of Antiquity

“What, then, shall a Catholic Christian do, if some small part of the Church cut itself off from the communion of the universal faith? What else but prefer the health of the whole body before the pestiferous and corrupt member? What if some new infection goeth about to corrupt, not in this case only a little part, but the whole Church? Then, likewise, shall he regard, and be sure to cleave unto Antiquity; which can now no more be seduced by any crafty novelty.” — Vincentius of Lerin. The Doctrine of the Fathers

The Riddle of Life

“The riddle of life is simply this. For some mad reason in this mad world of ours, the things which men differ about most are exactly the things about which they must be got to agree. Men can agree on the fact that the earth goes round the sun. But then it does not matter a dump whether the earth goes around the sun or the Pleiades. But men cannot agree about morals: sex, property, individual rights, fixity and contracts, patriotism, suicide, public habits of health – these are exactly the things that men tend to fight about. And these are exactly the things that must be settled somehow on strict principles. Study each of them, and you will find each of them works back certainly to a philosophy, probably to a religion.” — G. K. Chesterton, The Victorian Age

No New Thing

“To say that the present is a time of change and upheaval, social, political and religious, is to state a truism so obvious as to invite ironic contradiction. The cataclysm through which we are passing is at once so vast in its dimensions and so profound in its penetration of individual life, that we may well shrink from looking to history for guidance on circumstances to which history itself affords no parallel. Yet it is no new thing for the established manners, customs and beliefs of men to be upset. In all such times of violent transition the same great problem of the reconciliation between old and new forces itself upon the judgement of mankind, and it should not be impossible to find in the lesser crises of the past principles of thought and action which may help us to deal with the gigantic perplexities of today.” — Oliver Chase Quick, Essays in Orthodoxy 1916

Political Ideals

“Political ideals will vary according to men’s views on human destiny. Those who are persuaded that the purpose of life is pleasure, or power, or honour, will reckon that State best arranged in which they can live comfortably, or acquire great wealth, or achieve great power and lord it over many. Others who think that the crowning good of virtue is the purpose of our present life will want an arrangement under which men can live virtuously and peaceably together. In short, political judgment will be settled by the sort of life a man expects and proposes to lead by living in a community.” — St. Thomas Aquinas: Commentary on Aristotle’s ‘Politics,’ Book II, lect. 1.

In Which Case…

“You can spend your own money on yourself in which case quality and price are paramount. You can spend your money on others in which case price is paramount and quality less so. You can spend others’ money on you in which case you will have a fine lunch. Or you can spend other peoples money on other people in which case you have government.” — Milton Friedman